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Showing posts from November, 2019

Brent - Full Write-Up

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Arrival: Brent arrived in our care after his cage mate tragically passed away, leaving Brent on his own. Brent was still fairly young, his owners thought it would be best for him to go on and find some new friends to prevent him from being lonely, secondary to social isolation. When Brent arrived, he was showing signs of depression and was very withdrawn.  Once we were confident he was healthy, we bonded him to our mischief of bucks. You can follow us on social media: Facebook , Instagram , an Twitter For more information, check out our website You can donate to us via our Hay Experts Wishlist , Amazon Wishlist , and Paypal For any other enquiries, email: bacchusresidents@outlook.com First Stroke: Brent had a sudden onset of neurological abnormalities. His symptoms were suggestive of an ischaemic stroke (poss embolic) - we couldn't confirm this without advanced imaging and a neurologist's input. As treatment likely wouldn't have changed regardless of a

Donkey - Capturing a Stray Degu

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We were initially alerted about a stray chinchilla, which then turned into a stray gerbil. There had been numerous sightings throughout a housing estate in Congleton. A local then spotted the animal in their garden and managed to grab them, the rodent managed to administer a strong bite and escaped. The locals identified the animal as a degu. We spent a few nights in torrential rain searching for the degu but to no avail. We decided the best way forward would be to humanely trap the degu(s) and bring them to safety. After briefly interviewing the locals, we managed to pinpoint the most common sites the degu(s) had been seen. We set the traps in common locations. Within a few days, Donkey was captured. We kept the traps set for an additional week in case the sightings had been of more than one animal. Once Donkey had been removed from the wild, there had been no further sightings and the traps remained clear. It's highly unlikely there was more than 1 degu. You can follow

African Pouched Rats Care:

General Information: There are four species of African pouched rats:  Cricetomys emini (Emin's pouched rat) Cricetomys kivuensis (Kivu giant pouched rat) Cricetomys ansorgei (Southern pouched rat) Cricetomys gambianus (Gambian pouched rats). We are mainly discussing the Emin's pouched rat and the Gambian pouched rats most commonly found in the exotic pet trade, with Gambian pouched rats being the most commonly kept pouched rat . It's difficult to distinguish between the Emin's pouched rat and the Gambian pouched rat, but here are a few features that may help you differentiate between the two: Emin's pouched rats are usually smaller (1.5kg), whereas Gambian pouched rats can weigh up to 2kg. Emin's pouched rats have a sleeker appearance.  Gambian pouched rats are grey/brown with a subtle change to a lighter colour around the abdomen, Emin's pouched rats are a significantly 'browner' and have a much more solid difference in colour arou

Enoch, Egbert, Einstein, and Edward

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Today's post will be about 4 rats who came into our care on the 26th of June 2019. They've had various final outcomes!  The rats arrived as their previous owner could no longer care for them. Sadly, the rats weren't kept in suitable conditions - we don't think it was malicious mistreatment. The rats were kept within close proximity of smokers. As rats have sensitive respiratory systems, it caused significant irritation with some of the rats.  Once they arrived in our care, they were quarantined and monitored for potentially undetected health issues. We will separate the post into sections regarding an individual rat. You can follow us on social media: Facebook , Instagram , and Twitter You can donate to us via our Paypal , Amazon Wishlist , and Hay Experts Wishlist For more information, visit our website For other enquiries, please email: bacchusresidents@outlook.com Enoch: Enoch arrived as a 2-year-old buck. Fortunately, he had, and still hasn't h