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Showing posts from January, 2020

Gizmo - Full Write-Up

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Gizmo was one heck of a fighter! He suffered from chronic respiratory disease; one of the most common diseases amongst mice and rats.  Arrival: Gizmo arrived cohabiting with 3 other entire male rats, Trev, Crumbs, and Norman. Unfortunately, due to severe neurological illness, Crumbs had to be euthanised within 24hrs of arriving. Gizmo and Trev suffered from CRD - Trev being the most severe. The poor boys went through so many lifestyle changes when they arrived, but handled everything in their stride. Within a few days, it became clear that Gizmo was the top-rat. He was incredibly territorial at times, but Norman and Trev mostly knew how to stay out of his way. Unfortunately, Trev became extremely unwell as his disease worsened. There became a day when we had to make the decision to have him humanely euthanised - leaving Gizmo and Norman together. Throughout his time here, Gizmo was no picture of health himself. As we've mentioned, Gizmo faced numerou

Benjamin and Brody

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Benjamin and Brody are two male Mongolian gerbils who've been in our care for a very long time! They arrived at roughly 10 weeks old on the 6th of July 2019. You can follow us on social media:  Facebook ,  Instagram , and  Twitter To learn more about us, visit  our website You can donate to us via our  Paypal ,  Amazon Wishlist ,  Patreon ,  GoFundMe  and  Hay Experts Wishlist For any other enquiries, please email bacchusresidents@outlook.com These boys have done their fair share of waiting to find their perfect forever home. Brody and Benjamin are typical gerbils, they can be somewhat quick to handle, but they're very social and friendly once caught.  They spend a large amount of time burrowing and absolutely love shredding cardboard - so make sure to save your toilet roll tubes if you're thinking of adopting them. They must live in a 3ft tank minimum as they're very active gerbils. Ensure they have plenty of safe substrates. For more information

Pam, Patsy, and Pierre

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Eurasian harvest mice may be the most adorable animal on this earth. We got a great opportunity to expand our experience and knowledge of Eurasian harvest mice after a biologist was unable to release 3 harvest mice due to weather conditions. The biologist was also moving away, so they were searching for a space with individuals who can care for Eurasian harvest mice - that happened to be us.  Visit our website for information about Eurasian harvest mice and their care; https://www.bacchusresidents.co.uk/eurasian-harvest-mice-care.html You can follow us on social media:  Facebook ,  Instagram , and  Twitter To learn more about us, visit  our website You can donate to us via our  Paypal ,  Amazon Wishlist ,  Patreon ,  GoFundMe  and  Hay Experts Wishlist For any other enquiries, please email bacchusresidents@outlook.com Pam and Patsy are two friendly sisters. It's generally not advised to handle harvest mice as you can easily injure them due to their tiny size, ho

Sugar Glider Care

General Information: We've noticed that sugar gliders are an exotic animal with so many misconceptions and misinformation surrounding their care. This is partly due to a lack of education as well as a lack of research surrounding proper husbandry. You must be well educated before committing to a pet sugar glider as many of the most common health issues seen in captivity are the result of improper care. Sugar gliders are an absolutely adorable gliding possum and belong to the marsupial class. Marsupials are not rodents, not even close. In fact, sugar gliders closer to Kangaroos! Most marsupials carry their young within a pouch and are usually found in Australia and in the Americas. The sugar glider is commonly found throughout mainland Australia, New Guinea, Tasmania, and other local areas. They're nocturnal and omnivorous and their diet is incredibly challenging to replicate in captivity (we will touch on that later). They're highly social mammals and it can of

Maggie, Marian, Mildred, and Maude

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Maggie, Marian, and Mildred: The three does arrived in our care from a breeder. Unfortunately, the girl's parents both passed away prematurely. The cause of death was a potentially inheritable heart defect. The breeder didn't believe it would be fair to rehome potentially unhealthy rats and decided to seek sanctuary for the pups - we took three does. We agreed with the breeder, it wasn't suitable to rehome rats who may have inherited a potentially deadly heart defect. Maggie, Mildred, and Marian were bonded to our mischief of does and neutered bucked. You can follow us on social media:  Facebook ,  Instagram , and  Twitter To learn more about us, visit  our website You can donate to us via our  Paypal ,  Amazon Wishlist ,  Patreon ,  GoFundMe  and  Hay Experts Wishlist For any other enquiries, please email bacchusresidents@outlook.com Maude: Sadly, the reputable breeder had a second issue arise with one of the pups in a litter. Maude was

Xalvador and Benedict

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Benedict and Xalvador arrived in our care on the 21st of November 2019. They're two stunning-year-old bucks with outgoing personalities - particularly Benedict.  Both boys went on to be bonded to the other bucks as we believed they'd benefit from being in a larger group. You can follow us on social media:  Facebook ,  Instagram , and  Twitter To learn more about us, visit  our website You can donate to us via our  Paypal ,  Amazon Wishlist ,  Patreon ,  GoFundMe  and  Hay Experts Wishlist For any other enquiries, please email bacchusresidents@outlook.com Benedict's Castration: Once we'd monitored Benedict's behaviour for some weeks, we noticed his behaviour had a significant hormonal influence which was causing stress with the other rats.  Benedict wasn't drawing blood from other rats, but he was creating an uncomfortable atmosphere. We decided it'd be beneficial to have him castrated. Before his surgical appointment, Benedict had de

Lesser Hedgehog Tenrec Care

General Information: Originally from Madagascar, the domestic lesser hedgehog tenrec is a phenomenal example of convergent evolution. Believe it or not, hedgehogs and tenrecs aren't even remotely related to each other despite their similarities. Convergent evolution describes two species that have similar structures or features, usually with the same function but are not closely related.  Hedgehogs and Tenrecs have both evolved to have spines/quills on their body that can be used as a defence mechanism. There are slight differences in their spines, but their function is the same. Lesser Madagascan tenrecs are members of the order Afrosricida, the suborder Tenrecomorpha, and in the family Tenrecidaie. They're also the only species in the genus Echinops. Despite their similar appearance, care for the lesser Madagascan tenrec isn't the same as African Pygmy Hedgehogs (the common domestic hedgehog). They're an omnivorous mammal that is mostly insectivorous. The

Striped Skunk Care

General Information: Skunks are not common pets, so they're considered exotic mammals. You must do your research before deciding if you want a skunk as a pet. They all have incredibly different personalities and, if unsocialised, they can be aggressive.  They belong to the family mephitidae, which translates to stink. Skunks can be comparable to animals such as polecats and badgers. The domesticated skunk is Mephitis mephitis (which loosely translates to 'bad odour'), commonly known as the striped skunk. They're crepuscular or nocturnal animals and are usually solitary but do naturally have overlapping home territories. Fun Fact: In the UK, it is illegal to remove a skunk's anal scent glands. Skunks are probably most known for their anal scent gland which can produce a foul odorous spray when feeling threatened. They can spray as far as 3 metres!  They can live for around 6-10 years. You can follow us on social media:  Facebook ,  Instagram ,